Lee Stanton Blog


Schuyler's Top Pick

 One of Schuyler Samperton's favorite pieces is our Vintage Wallpaper. As she describes "I adore the colors in this chinoiserie-inspired print  – so modern and unexpected. It has a bit of a louche elegance that reminds me of something that Anita Pallenberg would have in her dressing room."

Visit her website to learn more www.samperton.com

 


A Contemporary Feast

Almost over, this buying trip has been anything but boring; I came across beautiful pieces ranging from 16th cent. tapestries to art deco sofas. I cannot wait to share what we have found.

To draw from some inspiration of mixing classical antiquity with modern design, check out the exhibition "Make yourself comfortable at Chatsworth" hosted by The Duke and Duchess of Devonshire. 

Photo: Wallpaper Magazine 

Wallpaper Magazine gives us a sneak preview. Words by Wallpaper Magazine:

Photo: Wallpaper Magazine

Photo: Wallpaper Magazine

‘Through this exhibition we are trying to share with visitors our experience of the place and the reality of it,’ says Hannah Obee, who for 12 years has been working as the curator of Chatsworth. ‘It is not just a stately home, but a layered collection of contemporary arts.’ The Cavendish family has over the centuries been keen to collect contemporary art and objects, so the house’s displays range from 18th and 19th century British and French painting and frescos to a collection of paintings by Lucian Freud, site-specific installations and objects that vary from stones and quartz to contemporary ceramics.   Information : 'Make Yourself Comfortable' at Chatsworth runs beetween 28 March - 23 October 2015; www.chatsworth.org

Read the entire article on wallpaper magazine here

Follow us on the buying trip through instagram – @leestantonla

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South African Deco

 

Photo: Elle Decoration April 2015 

The Former editor of Elle Decoration South Africa lays down roots in an Art Deco loft with an infusion of antiquity. Find similar pieces at Lee Stanton Antiques:

 

England circa 1820 apothecary cabinet (AO11),
England circa 1900 folding chair in maple (u041908a)

 

Photo: Elle Decoration April 2015

Laureen Rossouw bought a converted office space 10 years ago in Cape Town South Africa in the Business District, all her friends thought she was crazy at the time. With her husband, they slowly changed the anatomy of the building, as Laureen describes "Wanting to create the sense of an old fashioned waiting room in a train station". A unique look and a difficult one. A favorite possession of hers is a vintage early 1900's train station clock fixed to the side of a bookcase. Over time she has been able to collect vintage and antique pieces to infuse in the art deco structured apartment. Harmonizing the both styles in a way to complement one another, antique stools and books mixed with a 70's deco side board and sofa.

Photo: Elle Decoration April 2015 

Laureen's home is a great example of how one can mix antiques with a style on the other end of the spectrum and still accomplish a sophisticated look while carefully implementing her own personality.

 

 

France circa 1880 upholstered top stool (BA170)
France circa 1930 metal bookcase (BA182)

 

 

Read the entire article in the April issue of Elle Decoration UK

View more at leestanton.com or stashla.com


Living In A Flat World

Image of the guest room from my home in Los Angeles. ELLE DECOR, March 2015.

Flat screen TVs, computer monitors, laptops and smart phones have become a necessity in our lives today.  We are inspired from images on Pinterest, Instagram and HGTV.  We shop for furniture, clothes and even the food we eat on line.

Have we progressed into a flat world of design that has lost a sense of dimension, texture and experiential beauty? Has design become homogenized?  Do we really believe that creativity is limited to what we see online and that we cannot explore our own identity without falling off the edge?  How often do we look at the same chairs, tables and bookcases made on an assembly line, etched with lasers and assembled in China with a spray finish that everyone can purchase from an online catalog?  Is knocking off items and tweaking them a bit our idea of being creative?  Have we lost our sense of personal style and identity? Are the things in our homes or the homes we decorate void of relevance, provenance and emotion?

 

Image of the kitchen & dining area from my home in Los Angeles. ELLE DECOR, March 2015.

Imagine the days when people believed the world was flat and they couldn’t travel it without the fear of falling off. It seems we have regressed to those thoughts in design.  I challenge us to look beyond those flat screens and explore the multi-dimensional, infinite and creative world of design. 

Think organically. Search for one-of-a-kind objects from different eras or origins, embrace texture and explore different materials. Let’s stop drinking the kool-aid. Let’s pick our own fruit and let our own creative juices flow. Let’s go out and not only explore a multi-dimensional design world, but let’s also contribute to the diversity of an even greater world of design.

 

England circa 1930's Palladian Mirrors (AV124),
France circa 1920 industrial desk (AW188)
France circa 1880 terra cotta fragment as a desk lamp (B67),
England circa 1880 globe on mahogany stand.
France circa 1880 collection of artist molds (BA162),
England circa 1880 green leather desk chair (BA193)

 

I define my space and assembled a collection of things I love. The collection spans more than 3 centuries from around the world and every object tells a story. In perspective I created a space that defines me.

 

View my story in the March Issue of Elle decor online and on shelves now.

View more at leestanton.com or stashla.com


Dealer's Choice

Photo: Bjorn Wallander  

I'm honored to have my Los Angeles home featured in the March issue of Elle Decor (now on news stands). As written, I wanted to utilize the high rise building's plate glass windows as a contemporary backdrop for my art and antique collection, which i've accumulated over a lifetime of buying trips.

Photo: Bjorn Wallander

Photo: Bjorn Wallander

Photo: Bjorn Wallander  

 The antique furnishings have simple straight lines, which complement the linear contemporary architecture; illustrating how antiques can emphasize a modern aesthetic. 

Photo: Bjorn Wallander

This project was a departure from my home in Laguna Beach (seen in the November 2014 issue of Architectural Digest), where I placed antiques in a traditional English manor house.

 

Photo: Bjorn Wallander

The contrast of the two homes demonstrate the versatility of antiques. I Hope you enjoy the story.

Read the entire story in the March 2015 issue of Elle Decor on news stands now.

It was a pleasure to work with the talented photographer Bjorn Wallander, and the legendary Robert Rufino Interiors Editor.

View more at leestanton.com or stashla.com


French Connection

Photo: Elle Decoration UK March 2015 

In the March issue of Elle Decoration UK, a Milanese interior designer shows off his Parisian apartment.

Photo: Elle Decoration UK March 2015 

 

 

 England circa 1880 barley twist lamps (AY211B)
Italy circa 1900's reproduced map of Rome (LSC21)

 

Photo: Elle Decoration UK March 2015 

England circa 1890 green trunk (BA126)
France circa 1900 glass bottles with stoppers (AY141)

 

 

To read the entire article pick up the March 2015 issue of Elle Decoration UK

View more at leestanton.com or stashla.com


Antique vs. Vintage

 

I am always asked what defines an antique vs. a vintage piece. Both are somewhat fluid terms today. A purist would say an antique must be 100 years and that a vintage piece is anything less.

However, the “100 year“ rule was more applicable when methods of production were different, periods of style had longevity and eras were more constant. The lengths of eras or periods have progressively gotten shorter over time. Today, styles or periods change in a matter of years or decades vs. centuries. Quality has deteriorated and items are not made to last for future generations. "AN ART DECO OR MID-CENTURY MODERN PIECE IS BY DEFINITION "VINTAGE". TODAY THAT SAME PIECE IS CONSIDERED BY MOST IN THE DESIGN BUSINESS AS AN ANTIQUE".

Therefore, I suggest the following explanation. A used item is something that can be purchased new but has changed character as a result of use. A vintage item’s character has changed as a result of production. It may be a different raw product used such as a different quality leather, wood or type of stone that is no longer available. It may be a change of design such as shape, color or simply functional adaptation. It may be a different method of production such as machine stitched vs. hand-stitched or a rubbed finish vs. a sprayed finish. This change makes the vintage piece unique, limited and a more desirable object from the past. 

The distinguished character of an antique is based upon longevity. It is completely out of production. It’s origin or provenance is from a different and usually once removed era or period of style. Yet it has withstood change and is still relevant today. In fact, the antique is even more desirable as a result of the aging process and originality that has evolved over time.

You can view the entire email here - http://bit.ly/1DIvVKO

View more at leestanton.com or stashla.com


Industrialized Living

Photo: AD Espana Sept. 2014

In the September issue of AD Espana, an industrial loft in turned into a motorcycle enthusiast dream home.

 

Italy circa 1900's map of Rome (LSC21)
England circa 1970's floor lamp (B142)
Germany circa 1940 pair of metal lockers (AW4)

 

Photo: AD Espana Sept. 2014

 

 

England circa 1850 workbench (AY37)
England circa 1880 display case (BA50)
England circa 1890 pair of ship mirrors (BA123)

 

 

 

View more inventory at leestanton.com